Few have put their lives on the line as journalist Benjamin Fulford has done. Going from the peak of his journalistic career, a massive salary and access to almost any door he wanted open, the former Asia-Pacific Bureau Chief of Forbes Magazine stepped away in disagreement of massive censoring and has since started reporting on geopolitical events that certain “elites” wish he would not. Blowing the whistle on a wide variety of topics, including 9/11 and Fukushima, Fulford has drawn the attention of many around the world and has even survived 5 assassination attempts.
The Mind Unleashed was fortunate to be able to interview Mr. Fulford.
1. What is your education and journalistic background Benjamin? 
My educational background is varied. I went to grade school in Mexico and Canada and studied in Spanish and English. My high school was in French. When I was 17 I went to the Amazon and studied under a Shipibo shaman on the banks of the Ucuyali river in Northern Peru.
My university education was Sophia University in Tokyo and the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. My degree is in Asian studies with a China area specialty. However, since I took about 10 years worth of undergraduate courses I think of myself as a generalist.
2. You also speak multiple languages, yes? 
Yes. Native or near native in English, Japanese, French and Spanish. Conversational ability in Mandarin and the various romance languages.
3. Being with such a well known media company (Forbes), what caused you to leave your job? 
There were many reasons but mainly it had to do with censorship. When Citibank was kicked out of Japan because they were caught money laundering for crime gangs, Forbes would not run the story even though my sources were Finance Ministry officials speaking on the record.
The final straw was when they asked me to do a story about a computer virus software company. I went to the Philippines to visit their laboratories and while there I went to visit the creator of the “I love you” virus that caused billions of dollars worth of damage. He claimed the anti-virus company paid him to make the virus.